BAMBOO GRASS AND PAULOWNIA YAMANAKA LACQUERWARE NATSUME MATCHA CONTAINER
$141.00

Bamboo Grass and Paulownia Yamanaka Lacquerware Natsume Matcha Container

USD $141

Only 9 pieces in stock!

his "Natsume" is lacquered with a technique called "tame-urushi," in which a base coat of vermilion is applied and finished with a coat of translucent lacquer over it, so that the reddish color increases with time. The chic colors are well suited to the dignified bamboo grass and paulownia tree paintings.

A "natsume" is a type of container for powdered matcha. It is not used for storage, but for holding powdered matcha for use at tea ceremonies.

When pouring matcha into a "natsume", do not put it directly into the "natsume", but first sift it into a different container using a tea strainer.

This is because matcha tends to become lumpy due to static electricity, and if you brew matcha with lumps, it will not be pleasant to the palate.

The powdered matcha is then scooped out with a tea scoop and placed into the "natsume" in a rounded shape.

Pair this "chashaku" tea scoop for a unified look. 

Just by placing it on a dining table or cupboard, it becomes an eye-catching decorative item. Also, depending on your ideas, it would be great to put not only Matcha powder but also other small items such in it.

To avoid moisture, do not wash in water. We recommend cleaning with a soft cloth or brush.

PRODUCT DETAIL

  • Dimension:  D6.7cm(2.6in) x H7cm(2.8in)
  • MaterialWood - Yamanaka Lacquerware
  • Coating: Lacquer 
  • Origin: Made in Ishikawa, Japan

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about yamanaka lacquerware

Yamanaka lacquerware is produced in the Yamanaka Onsen area of Kaga City, Ishikawa Prefecture, and has a history of about 400 years.
The traditional techniques of Yamanaka lacquerware were highly evaluated and became known throughout Japan, despite a period of temporary interruption.
It is characterized by the use of wood grain patterns to express a natural texture, and is made with great attention to detail.
It was designated as a traditional craft by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry in 1975.